Bell Geared Steam Locomotives

Geared Steam Locomotive Works

Home| Baldwin| Bell| Byers| Climax| Davenport| Dewey| Dunkirk| Heisler| Other| Rod| Shay| Willamette|
Books| Search| Mail Me| Videos|
 Help!

<Bell Article List

"An Ideal Industrial Locomotive: No Smoke, No Steam, No Coal"
Popular Science Monthly - June, 1918

Note the oil tank in front of the boiler, 
which replaces the cumbersome coal-tender.

 


With
coal scarce and gasoline high-priced and much in demand for all of our war activities, the oil-fired steam locomotive, burning heavy grades of distillate or crude oil, is now winning favor in plants where switching engines haul goods over short distances. The oil-fired locomotive has many uses. It is found hauling logs in camps far away from coal supplies or wending its way on sugar plantations; or busily transporting from excavations for New York's new subway system muck, rails, ties and ballast. Contractors select the oil-fired locomotive because it does not pollute the atmosphere with smoke.  **** DO NOT COPY ****  Violators will be prosecuted!  gearedsteam.com

In appearance, the fuel-fired locomotive, as shown in the accompanying illustrations, does not differ much from the familiar coal-fed type, except that a separate tank out in front of the boiler takes the place of the usual coal-tender. The cost of operation is said to be less than one cent a ton per mile. The construction is clearly shown in the accompanying cross-sectional view. **** DO NOT COPY ****  Violators will be prosecuted!  gearedsteam.com
 

The new industrial oil-fired steam locomotive in cross-sectional view.
 Each part is plainly illustrated, showing the compact construction  of this coal-saving iron horse.
 

________________________________________________

 

This information was transcribed from the article entitled "An Ideal Industrial Locomotive: No Smoke, No Steam, No Coal" that appeared on page 851 of the June, 1910 issue of   Popular Science Monthly.

Notes:

  1. The top image's caption incorrectly states the "oil tank" is located in front of the boiler.   As the bottom image correctly notes, the water tank is located in front of the boiler with the "fuel tank" being located inside the cab behind the boiler.
     
  2. The title and text of the article notes the locomotive does not create smoke during operation.   Although we can't conclusively say "no smoke" was created in operation,  it seems very probable that smoke would be produced when using oil, especially crude oil.    When kerosene was used for fuel, minimal or no smoke would have been produced.
     
  3. The title incorrectly notes "No Steam".   The foundation of any steam locomotive, Bell locomotives included, is the production and utilization of steam for propulsion. 
     

Home| Baldwin| Bell| Byers| Climax| Davenport| Dewey| Dunkirk| Heisler| Other| Rod| Shay| Willamette|
Books| Search| Mail Me| Videos|
 Help!

   We  Need  Your  Help!  

Page changed: February 09, 2013 08:21:23 AM